PAST SHOWS

ALISONNEIL.CO.UK One-Woman Shows

Past Shows

BELLA – THE STORY OF MRS BEETON

 

 

Alison Neil’s first one-woman play BELLA - THE STORY OF MRS BEETON opened in 1988 and toured until 2002. The play had hundreds of performances in theatres, arts centres, festivals, castles and stately homes, and at small community venues such as libraries and village halls. The play was a favourite of Womens Institutes, and was also performed at Rotary, Inner Wheel and Soroptimist meetings. It played at the National Portrait Gallery, where the famous photograph of Mrs Beeton can be seen, and at the Queen’s Stand at the Epsom Racecourse, where Mrs Beeton spent her childhood.

 

Alison only stopped performing the show when she felt that she was too old to portray the 28-year-old Bella. She still receives requests for the play; hence the new re-telling of the story in “MRS BEETON, MY SISTER” her play for 2015 and beyond.

 

BELLA – THE STORY OF MRS BEETON was adapted as a BBC Radio 4 Saturday Afternoon play, first broadcast in 2001.

 

Alison provided the research, text and pictures for a permanent exhibition about Mrs Beeton at the Queen’s Stand at the Epsom Racecourse.

 

 

What the critics said

"An extraordinary one-woman show...such was the power of Alison Neil's performance that I am convinced I now know Mrs Beeton personally”

Paul Heiney - THE TIMES

 

“A totally riveting performance…which deserves to become a theatre classic. Comparable with the one-woman performances of the great Ruth Draper”

LYNN NEWS

 

"Highly entertaining, from start to finish, and fascinating in its content. Forget the cookery, but don't miss the play."

OXFORD TIMES

 

"Superbly disciplined acting"

EASTERN DAILY PRESS

 

"Worthy of Joyce Grenfell.”

OXFORD TIMES

 

"This attractive and spontaneous show... keeps interest bubbling continually"

SPEECH AND DRAMA MAGAZINE

 

“A marvellously sustained piece of acting”

SOUTH WALES EVENING POST

 

"The linguistic power of Alison Neil's script and her mesmeric performance of it"

HALSTEAD GAZETTE

 

 

The Play

MRS BEETON... a fat, old Victorian cook? Far from it!

 

Isabella Beeton did exist - she was a journalist, wife and mother who had written her masterpiece, "BEETON'S BOOK OF HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT AND COOKERY" by the time she was twenty-four.

 

Alison Neil’s fast-moving and entertaining play brings this extraordinary, brilliant woman to life.

 

Her childhood was spent living in the Grand Stand building on the Epsom Race Course, where she was the eldest girl in a family of twenty-one children. A gifted pianist, and fluent in French and German, she married the publisher Sam Beeton before she was twenty. Their close working partnership involved Isabella in every aspect of publishing, and her unsurpassed book on "HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT", covering every aspect of running a home, has never been out of print. Her own busy life as a working mother in a publishing office was very different from the recipe for Victorian domestic bliss given in her best-selling book!

 

Her happy marriage and successful business life were blighted by personal tragedy, and she herself died following the birth of her fourth child, at the age of twenty-eight.

 

Amongst numerous other venues, it was performed at:

 

YVONNE ARNAUD THEATRE, Guildford, Surrey

PRINCESS THEATRE, Hunstanton, Suffolk

GEORGIAN THEATRE, Richmond, Yorkshire

PALACE THEATRE, Westcliff, Essex

 

THE QUEEN'S STAND, Epsom Race-Course

THEATRE MUSEUM, Covent Garden, London

NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, London

BODELWYDDAN CASTLE, North Wales

YORK ART GALLERY, Yorkshire

IRONBRIDGE GORGE MUSEUM, Shropshire

 

CHELTENHAM LITERARY FESTIVAL

LLANDRINDOD WELLS VICTORIAN FESTIVAL

SWANSEA FESTIVAL

 

DILLINGTON COLLEGE, Somerset

THEOBALDS COLLEGE, Herts

ST ANTHONY-LEWESTON SCHOOL, Dorset

 

STOKE PRIOR VILLAGE HALL, Herefordshire

MILTON ABBOT VILLAGE HALL, Devon

ALBURY VILLAGE HALL, Surrey

 

and many, many others across the UK

 

Alison Neil's second one-woman play "THE SIXTH WIFE" (the story of Katherine Parr) opened in 1992, and toured until 2016. The play had hundreds of performances in theatres, arts centres, festivals, stately homes, and at smaller community venues up and down the country. It was performed in Gloucester Cathedral and Berkeley Castle.

 

The scenery included a spectacular "stained glass window"; this was a scaled-down version of the window in Westminster Abbey depicting Henry VIII and his first wife Catherine of Aragon. The window was originally part of an exhibition on Henry VIII at Greenwich Maritime Museum.

 

The paintings on the set were by Elizabeth Waghorn.

The story of Henry VIII and his wives goes in and out of fashion, and the play also proved to be particularly popular every few years. 2012 saw a large number of performances, as people asked for "anything royal", to celebrate the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

 

Alison finally stopped performing the show in 2016, as she felt that she was, sadly, too old to continue playing Katherine Parr, who died at the age of 36.

 

Alison portrayed Katherine Parr at a three-day event at Sudeley Castle, as part of the company Past Pleasures, recreating Tudor life. Katherine Parr spent some of her time at Sudeley Castle, and is buried there.

 

What the critics said

"A delightful evening which had the audience in raptures" BORDON HERALD

 

“The production was pure brilliance… an outstanding performance. It is a long, long time since I was so captivated.” TENBY ARTS FESTIVAL

 

"Alison Neil tells a riveting tale" OXFORD TIMES

 

"Great show…a delightful entertainment. A performance every bit as witty and assured as her own script" OXFORD MAIL

 

"Neil's play superbly delves into the history and politics of the time. She knows how to hold an audience, which she does with consummate skill.” BORDON HERALD

 

"Alison Neil created a myriad of players…An entertaining and at times funny commentary on the life of one of our most notorious monarchs" STROUD NEWS

 

The Play

THE SIXTH WIFE

 

 

 

"Henry VIII had six wives”… one of the few historical facts most of us remember from our schooldays. But why did he marry so many times? And who was that shadowy figure, Katherine Parr - the sixth wife who survived him?

 

"THE SIXTH WIFE" is set in the night, as Katherine Parr waits for her husband the King to die. She takes the opportunity to reflect on her extraordinary life, and the reign of the glorious, tyrannical - and tragic - Henry VIII.

 

Katherine Parr saw each of his wives as they came and went - in a variety of unpleasant ways.

 

Her own life was far from peaceful: four marriages, two indictments for treason, one love affair, power, wealth and death at the age of 36. She became Queen Regent when Henry went to fight the French; she helped to form the new religion of England; she also befriended a lonely and abandoned child - who later became Queen Elizabeth I.

 

In this fast-moving and entertaining play, Katherine casts her witty, observant eye over the turbulent Tudor age; and shows how a 'mere woman' could shape the mind of a King - and the future of a nation.

 

FULL VERSION

ACT ONE Running time: 50 minutes

Interval

ACT TWO Running time: 50 minutes

 

ONE HOUR VERSION

Edited play with NO interval. Running time: 1 hour 5 minutes